Big Bend National Park’s Black Gap Road

It’s April in the Chihuahuan Desert, and that means road trip.  Jodie and I hooked up the Palomino Banshee popup camper to the Jeep and headed off into the backroads of Big Bend National Park, down one of our favorite, although less traveled roads, the Black Gap Road.  This is the toughest road in the park from the standpoint of technical offroad travel, although it is very tame compared to many other routes we’ve navigated throughout the country in the past.  So, we took off for three days of solitude, seeking the colorful variety of blooming plants found this time of the year in the Chihuahuan Desert.

Our first encounter was an old friend of the desert this time of the year, a snake called a red racer.  They are a bright copper-red color, and this one was about 5 feet long:

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Some of the cactus in bloom are the claret cup, cane cholla, and strawberry cactus:

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Our campsite on the Glenn Springs primitive road, on the way to Black Gap:

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One of the many small, unnamed side canyons along the road:

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The Black Gap Road is barely a road in places, as it snakes across dry creekbeds and into and out of drainages that run from the Chisos Mountains to the Rio Grande River.  Elephant Tusk peak and the Chisos Mountains are in the background:

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The road gets its name from the “black gap,” a cut through the volcanic intrusion that separates two drainages.  The old surface through the “gap” is crumbled away and users of the road keep the drop-off filled with loose rocks to form a ramp to keep your rig off high center.  It’s a very easy route, but requires high clearance:

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The remnants of the Mariscal Mine, an old mercury mine from the early 20th century, provided a nice backdrop for a break:

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We join the River Road, and pull down a side road to an old fishing camp/campsite along the Rio Grande River…U.S. on the left bank and Mexico a stone’s throw across on the right:

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Prickly Pear cactus blooming with the Chisos Mountains in the background:

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When Jodie tells me to “go fly a kite,” I take her literally:

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Nearly full moon over our camp, and Orion setting in the west with the last glow of sunset:

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We awoke the third, and last morning, to a beautiful sunrise over the Sierra del Carmen Mountains in Mexico:

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