“Patience”, defined:

My previous post is a look at our backyard friend, the Rio Grande Leopard frog. He is one of two in residence at our pond.

Today, as I watched him sunning himself on a rock near the waterfall, a honeybee (with a death wish) caught my eye. Now, frogs eat flying insects, of which a bee is one. The following sequence demonstrates the rewards of patience:

Rio Grande Leopard frog, keeping a sharp eye on the honey bee, who is already tempting fate.
The bee lands on the frogs back, then walks up to between the frog’s eyes to lap up some of the water on the frog’s head. Bad idea.
The bee tires of the frog and finds a small puddle of pond water to fulfill his needs. Another bad idea.
In the blink of an eye, the frog does a jump-move to line up his prey in his gunsights.
A burp of satisfaction…even with my camera in the “spray and pray” mode (shooting at 8 frames per second), the frog’s tongue and its sticky glue-like coating had the bee ingested, so fast my camera could not catch the action.

Oh, well, I think I’ll go get some lunch. Thanks for watching.

Frog Friday

Since Stephen Gingold is confined to a sunless Friday due to an allergy to anti-tick meds, I thought I’d post a couple of pics in absentia on his behalf. These guys are Rio Grande Leopard Frogs, and have recently taken up residence in our backyard pond. Most folks don’t realize that even in the desert, where there is water, there are usually frogs.

Strawberry Moon

The first full moon after the Summer Solstice is known as the Strawberry Moon.

In ancient times, each full moon of every month had a name, usually associated with astronomical events, harvests, or other seasonal connections, and not relating to the actual color of the moon. The first full moon following the Summer Solstice, and the last full moon prior to the Autumnal Equinox, are known as Strawberry Moon, signifying the start and end of the strawberry picking season.

The full moon of tonight, June 24, would therefore be a Strawberry Moon.

Outer Mountain Loop – Big Bend NP

My friend Ken, his son Derek, and his grandson Alec made a trip to Big Bend to hike the classic “Outer Mountain Loop,” a 4-day, 3-night epic backpack journey across the high trails of the Chisos Mountains, down into the high desert south of the Chisos, and finishing at the trail up Juniper Canyon and back into the high Chisos. At least, that was the plan…until a 1300+ acre fire in the high Chisos complex shut down all hiking and camping on the central and eastern sections of the mountains. With the trail closures, we opted to cut the trip a day short and do the hike without the return across the mountains.

Ken, Alec and Derek at the trailhead in the Basin area of the Chisos Mountains. The Laguna Meadow Trail, and connecting Blue Creek Trail, were not affected by the fire, so the first day (and second day) were as originally planned.

Ken, Alec and Derek at the Trailhead
Trail through the red igneous “dikes” from the high Chisos, down Blue Creek Canyon to Homer Wilson Ranch.
Line cabin of the Homer Wilson Ranch at the location of camp #1.
Greater Earless Lizard watches as we pass by.
Turks Head Cactus in full double bloom along the trail.
After a dry spring, a recent rain rewarded us with a plethora of blooming cactus, such as this Strawberry Pitaya (Hedgehog).
Campsite a quarter mile east of the historic Homer Wilson Ranch line cabin.
Beautiful setting of blooming Cane Cholla and Strawberry Pitaya on the trail between Homer Wilson and the spring at Fresno Creek, about 7 miles east of camp.
A look back down the switchbacks of the Dodson Trail at the first saddle, at about 5,000′ altitude (a climb of about 900′ above our campsite).
Engelmann Pricklypear cactus in bloom along the trail.
The landmark “Elephant Tusk” as seen from the Dodson Trail just before we drop down into the Fresno Creek drainage.
The water flowing through the Fresno Creek bedrock is welcome to hot and tired backpackers Ken and Derek, as well as another very rare pleasure…SHADE.
Ken admires a not-so-shy Garter Snake enjoying the cool water in the spring.
Campsite the second night out, at the foot of the Chisos Mountains, which rise to a height of 7400′ above our campsite at 4600′ altitude.
A beautiful night for stars, the Milky Way rises in the southeast after midnight above our camp.
The ruins of the Dodson Ranch, a homestead in this very rough and remote area where a family ranched sheep and goats before the creation of Big Bend NP in the late 1940’s.
Ken, Derek and Alec next to an Agave, or Century Plant, in full bloom below the southeast rim of the Chisos Mountains.
After our hike out to the Jeep at the Juniper Canyon trailhead on day 3, we made a short drive down to the mouth of Santa Elena Canyon, where the Rio Grande River cuts through a fault that resulted in a 1500′ uplift, creating the canyon (Mexico on the left, the US on the right, as you look upcanyon).
Our third night on the trail was a short hike into the “Taj Mahal Hoodoo,” where we spent a loud, wet and windy night with thunderstorms dancing all around. No stars this night.
A really large Ocotillo, in full leaf and bloom, near our campsite.
Typical sunset as seen through storm clouds in the Chihuahua Desert.

We had a great time wandering around together through the desert, an unusually cool trip for this time of the year. This Outer Mountain Loop is not for novice hikers, as it requires a lot of planning to insure adequate water for multiple people. Be sure to use the expertise of the Big Bend National Park staff in making plans for this trip.

The Christmas Star

 
Last night was the “grand conjunction” of planets Jupiter and Saturn. The two planets were just .1 degree apart in the sky just after twilight. This is the closest conjunction of these planets since March 5, 1226. The most significant grand conjunction occurred in 7 B.C., and another in 3 B.C. , thus scientific support for the reference to this as a “Christmas Star.”

As twilight fades, stars of the night sky begin to appear, drawing attention to the magnitude of the brightness of these two planets in conjunction.

A pastor friend of mine offered the following information regarding the connection of this conjunction to Christmas:
“The last time a “grand conjunction” between Jupiter and Saturn occurred was 1226 A.D. Previous to that was 7 B.C., which was followed up by a very similar conjunction of Jupiter and Venus in 3 B.C. Johannes Kepler, a major figure from the scientific revolution which began in the 17th century, the scientist who first correctly explained the motion of the planets, referred to this as a “triple conjunction” because of the alignment of Jupiter, Saturn and the sun. He pointed out that this triple conjunction occurred three separate times in 7 B.C., a view confirmed by modern science. For dedicated, serious ancient stargazers like the Magi, this might have been just enough for them to saddle up their horses – or their camels – and take the long, long ride to Israel to check it out.”

The magnified conjunction, showing Jupiter and its four largest, most visible moons on the left, and Saturn to the right.