Family Ties Update

A week ago, I posted a story about a family of red tail hawks that had just hatched a little one and were tending the nest just outside of town. A return visit to the nest today begged for an update to the story:

After a week of absence, we dropped by the red tail hawk nest today, and to our great surprise, we spot a second little hawk on the nest. Mom & Dad were not far away, hunting for lunch and keeping a watchful eye on their brood.
A short time later, Mom returns and fills the bottomless bellies of her little ones, who immediately stretch out for an afternoon nap.

Family Ties

Spring has always been a time of renewal of life, a busy time of birth, new growth, and an awakening of all species. Nothing is more representative of that than a family of raptors nursing eggs to life, and caring for new youngsters. Just outside of town we’ve been watching a pair of redtail hawks tending to a nest, and yesterday we were treated to a special event…the first look at a 3-day-old chick being fed in the nest by a proud mom and an attentive dad.

Here, Dad is returning to the nest carrying a prairie dog, freshly harvested from a prairie dog town a few miles away.
The “handoff” as Mom helps by grabbing onto the meal as Dad lines up the nest for a landing.
Our first good look at the chick, as Mom begins to prepare the prairie dog for feeding by pre-digesting it in her gut, the new chick not quite ready to handle fresh meat straight from a kill.
Proud Dad admires his brood, as Mom seems to be saying, “You call that a meal? Go get desert!”
With that, Dad is off again. It’s a non-stop job, feeding a family of three or more.
Catch, deliver, repeat…
Meal preparation, redtail hawk style.
Mom and Baby.

Happy 50th. Earth Day

Today marks the 50th anniversary of Earth Day. To recognize its importance to those of us who cherish the natural beauty of this tiny planet we call home, I got out at 4:00 a.m. this morning to capture the Milky Way, including the galactic center which is now visible after its long winter nap below the horizon. This image captures the entire bow of the Milky Way, nearly from horizon to horizon…a sort of “MilkyWay-Bow” (with no rain, a rainbow is not an option this Earth Day). A Happy Earth Day to all!

Spring in Big Bend

As we all continue to deal with indoor confinement, we’re still finding ways to get outside for exercise, and in our case, primarily by bicycle. Spring here in Big Bend doesn’t know that it’s under a “shelter at home” order, and so it follows its normal pattern of the seasons. This year the wildflowers are far less spectacular than in years past, but we’ve managed to capture a few signs of spring by taking a camera with us while riding through the surrounding desert. Here are a few images that made us smile this past week:

Ocotillo:

IMG_6965 ocotillo cactus

Dog Cholla:

IMG_6970 flowers dog cholla

Purple Prickly Pear:

IMG_6982 flowers purple prickly pear

Strawberry Pitaya:

IMG_6979 flowers strawberry pitaya cactus

Bluebonnets:

IMG_7034 bluebonnets flowers

Another sure sign of spring is the mating ritual of wild turkey. These gobblers were “struttin’ their stuff” just off the Post Road near town:

P1110400 turkey

P1110427 turkey

Not far away, pronghorn antelope had moved closer to town with fewer humans out and about to scare them away:

P1110370 pronghorn

P1110366 pronghorn

And finally, this roadrunner decided to play “tag” with my camera, staying just far enough ahead of me to elude posing for a decent photo:

P1110453 roadrunner

It’s spring…get outside whenever you can for sun and exercise. It will brighten your spirits and get you away from that computer screen! Stay safe and well.

The Big Bend 100

The April, 2020, issue of Texas Parks and Wildlife Magazine’s cover story spotlights The Big Bend 100, a new 100-mile-long through-hike across the largest national park and the largest state park in Texas…Big Bend National Park and Big Bend Ranch State Park. The route description is available at www.bigbend100.com.

This month my good friend and longtime hiking buddy Joe joined me to hike several sections of the 50-mile route through the state park. Since both these parks cover hundreds of thousands of acres of the Chihuahua Desert, our main concerns were finding water where very little exists, and route-finding through an area of desert where no established trails exist…two factors that have the potential for disaster for the unprepared. In fact, just the day before we started out on the first leg of the route, there had been a search-and-rescue event to save lost hikers on the same trail we were attempting.

P1110142 Bob Joe

From the trailhead, the route crests a ridge and descends 200′ down into a drainage of Leyva Creek, a dry creek bed that drains this section of the mountains:

P1110144 trail

At about two miles, we find our first water, at a bedrock wall and pouroff across the creek:

P1110151 pouroff tinaja

A short distance down the creek e come upon another water feature, beautiful deep pools cut into the bedrock by years of flow:

P1110164 creek pool

P1110166 creek pool

Further along this “dry wash” we spot an igneous “dike,” formed by lava forced up into cracks and fissures in the earth which cools, then is exposed by eons of erosion, with more water pushed to the surface by the bedrock. The many prints in the sand are from longhorn cattle, deer, elk, javelina, desert bighorn sheep, aodad sheep, and the occasional bear or mountain lion:

P1110172 creek pool

Our campsite the first night was at the base of a beautiful granite wall, complete with a stream of running water just out our front door:

P1110181 tent camp

P1110182 canyon water

A short hike down canyon yields more water, not to mention fantastic views of the strata that makes up the interesting geology of this area:

P1110190 canyon pool

P1110195 canyon layers

After a beautiful, clear, cool night filled with stars, satellites, constellations, a few meteors and the Milky Way, we awake to the clamoring of the hooves of a group (herd or flock, whichever you prefer) of aodad (barbary) sheep. These are non-domestics imported from Africa years ago for hunting by area ranches, and are now running wild across west Texas, competing for scant resources with native species, such as desert bighorn sheep:

P1110309 milky way

P1110222 aodad

We headed north from camp for a day hike to find the trail that follows Terneros Creek to its intersection with Leyva Creek. Along the way we came upon a small cave that had obvious prehistorical use by native people, near a livestock pen that probably dates to the middle of the last century. We found rock art at the entrance, and the ceiling of the cave was blackened by years of fires burning for warmth and cooking:

P1110246

P1110250 rock art cave

Instead of following the designated trail that follows an old ranch road due north, we diverted through a side canyon, an extension of Lava Canyon, that shows on our topo maps to contain water. In fact, it contained LOTS of water:

P1110262

P1110269 lava canyon

 

P1110272 lava canyon

 

P1110274 lava canyon

At the end of the canyon, it turns into a form of “slot canyon” before opening out into Terneros Creek:

P1110276 lava canyon

After returning to camp, the day hike ended with a cool night under the stars, and a 5.5 mile hike back to the trailhead on the third day. We passed many signs of spring in full bloom, such as these Big Bend Bluebonnets:

P1110322 flowers bluebonnets

From the trailhead at Cinco Tinajas, the route passes the Sauceda Ranch House, now the location of the park interior headquarters, then follows the Leyva Loop ranch road to the Puerta Chilicote trailhead, and the start of the Mexicano Falls Trail which begins the second half of the route, and the remaining 25 miles of the Big Bend 100 through the state park. This section uses slightly more established trails, complete with cairns to aid in navigation:

P1100882 trail cairn

Some of the flowering cactus along the trail includes rainbow cactus as well as claret cup cactus in bloom:

P1100888 cactus

P1110077 flowers cactus

The trail follows cairns across solid rock until it drops down through a drainage to a spring indicated by telltale cottonwood trees:

P1100907 desert spring

At the bottom, a pouroff holds water in small tinajas, which can be filtered to replenish water supplies. This series of tinajas (spanish for “earthen jar”) features a large panel of rock art above a pool:

P1100916 desert spring

P1100921 rock art

From here the trail climbs 200′ over a saddle and follows the trail of cairns to a spectacular overlook above Mexicano Falls. This is the second highest accessible waterfall in Texas, and unlike Madrid Falls (which I covered in the previous blog post), it is more intermittent in flow:

P1100948 waterfall

My campsite was on a high mesa just past Mexicano Falls, and I was treated to the warm glow of late light:

P1100953 tent camp

P1100963 desert sunset

P1100968 sunset

As if that wasn’t enough, the sunrise next morning was breathtaking:

P1110027 sunrise

The views down Arroyo Mexicano, with the “Flatirons” of the Solitario (a round “lacolith” left from the volcanic activity of ancient times) in the distance:

P1110062 desert canyon mountains

P1110081 canyon mountains

Moonrise over another adventure on the trail:

P1100996 moon full

From Mexicano Falls, you can continue on southeast to the Mexicano Falls Trailhead, then down another half mile to Chorro Vista Camp, where you pick up Chorro Vista Trail which drops down to Madrid Falls. From Madrid Falls follow the Arroyo Primero Trail through Chorro Canyon, past the Madrid Ranch another mile and a half to Fresno Cascades, where you pick up the East Contrabando Trail which follows Fresno Creek for 11 miles to the end of the Big Bend 100 in Lajitas, at the East Contrabando Trailhead, all covered in previous posts.

Madrid Falls

Little known to most, we have an aquatic wonder right here in the Big Bend, in the Chihuahuan Desert, the driest region in the state. At 100′, it is the highest waterfall in Texas accessible to the public (although not easily accessible). It lies deep in the heart of Big Bend Ranch State Park. I spent a full day riding my mountain bike the 11 miles up East Contrabando Trail to Fresno Cascades, then hiking with day pack the remaining 2.5 miles, with the last mile up Chorro Canyon off-trail up the dry creekbed, then bushwhacking through rock and trees and reeds to one of the most beautiful grottos I’ve ever seen:

P1100857 madrid falls

After an 11-mile ride on mountain bike up the East Contrabando Trail, accessed from the Barton Warnock Center in Lajitas, TX, it’s time to hit the trail through Arroyo Primero for 2 1/2 miles, past the Madrid Ranch Homestead (covered in a previous post), then up Chorro Canyon mostly off-trail to the box canyon that features Madrid Falls and its accompanying pools and grotto:

Map

Along the way, I pass the first Big Bend Bluebonnets of the season, growing in the dry creek bed of Fresno Creek. Officially lupinus havardii, this is the tallest of the lupines:

P1100819 bluebonnets flowers

After passing the Madrid Homestead, you will cross a wide dry creek and continue up a well-defined trail to the sign “Primero Trailhead” that marks a hard southerly left turn. Continue on due west up Chorro Canyon:

P1100823 Chorro Canyon

The trail is faint, then when it disappears, just follow the path of least resistance up the dry creek bed, until you see the first signs of water, flowing from the falls and its pools:

P1100825 chorro spring

The canyon makes a hard left, up into a box canyon where you get the first glimpse of the top of the falls:

P1100826 madrid falls

From this point, stay out of the deep drainage and follow a fairly well-defined trail around the right side of the canyon until you begin to hit the lower pools:

P1100833 madrid falls spring

From here it’s a matter of bushwhacking your way through reeds, rocks, and the growth that accompanies water until you finally reach the pool at the base of the falls. There is a small upper falls (not visible in this photo, that drops into a small upper pool, then continues over the main falls:

P1100851 madrid falls

It’s hard to describe how this lush grotto feels when you encounter it in the middle of the Chihuahuan Desert after a long, warm, dry 13-mile hike/bike. It’s a true slice of heaven:

P1100852 madrid falls

After spending lunch here, and re-hydrating from the hike (don’t drink this water unfiltered…animals use this as a water source and it contains bacteria such as giardia), it’s time to enjoy the lower pools on the way back out of the canyon:

P1100846 madrid falls spring

P1100839 madrid falls spring